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3 Surprising Health Benefits of Swimming

January 19, 2014 0 Comments

Swimming is an amazing sport in countless ways.
But why do we love it so much? Why do our bodies crave it? Maybe we are sensing all the many hidden perks on a subconscious level.
The truth is, there are many surprising health benefits of swimming. I was totally caught off guard by the following three. Starting with:

1. Lowered Stress

Feeling haggard, tired or worn out? Has work got you completely drained? Well, how about a nice refreshing dip in the pool to reboot your battery?
Even a few quick exercises in the pool are enough to show positive effects. Think about it…the buoyant actionand movement of the water are really calming. Even the splashing sound is quite soothing.
It almost has a massage-esque quality to it. And it helps us calm down. Studies show that swimming stimulates the production of serotonin and ANP…which are common stress-relieving hormones. So, whether you are depressed, anxious, or totally stressed out, swimming should take the edge off that pain.

2. Healthier Brain

We are all completely aware that swimming is great for the body. That’s a huge reason why many of us decided to swim in the first place.
But what about the brain? Does swimming help improve your mind as well?
Apparently, yes!
A recent study was conducted to measure the effect that swimming has on the brain. It can promote a process called hippocampal neurogenesis………I bet you can’t say that five times fast…
Hippocampal neurogenesis is a fancy way of saying growth of brain cells in areas that were previously damaged by stress.
So, not only are you getting less stressed out in general (and therefore preventing aforementioned brain damage) but you can also correct the harm stress has already inflicted on the brain. And the key to all this magical healing is swimming!!!

3. Improved Asthma Symptoms

There is one crucial little element that swimming can provide that most other forms of exercising cannot…consistently moist air.
You’ve heard of exercise induced asthma, right? Asthma that’s brought on by the stress of exercise?
Well, we’re not even talking about that kind of asthma. We’re talking about alleviating your pre-existing, regular asthma conditions all together. During exercise or not.
A study including kids with asthma who participated in a 6 week swimming program revealed some amazing findings. After completing the program, there were improvements in “symptom severity, snoring, mouth-breathing, and hospitalizations and emergency room visits…” and “the health benefits were still apparent a year after the swimming program had ended.”
If you are one of many people who suffer from asthma, you know how royally it sucks. Swimming may just be the miracle cure you’ve been looking for. Or, at least, something worth trying. What’s the worst that could happen?

Were You Surprised?

How many of you knew all three of these surprising factoids about swimming?
Do you know any other interesting tid-bits that are sure to rock our socks off?
Please share in the comment section! We would all really appreciate the knowledge.

Ally Henley
Ally Henley



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