30 Minutes Per Day: Triathlon Training

30 Minutes Per Day: Triathlon Training

 

Racing in a triathlon can be an extremely fun and rewarding experience, but without proper preparation, it can be easy to get in over your head.  We at Underwater Audio have put together a useful guide to preparing for your first triathlon safely and effectively.  If you’ve ever wanted to participate in one of these events, this is a great starting point!

Training

1. Choose Your Triathlon Distance

The longer the race, the longer the preparation. As your race length increases, you will need to train more hours per week for more weeks in advance.  The chart on the right has some suggested training times for triathlons of various lengths.

A 30 minute per day triathlon training schedule is equivalent to 3.5 hours per week. That allotment of time is appropriate when training for a sprint triathlon or a super sprint triathlon. This is a short-distance triathlon, the perfect choice for people who are just starting out.

At the other end of the spectrum is the extremely challenging Ironman triathlon, a much more difficult and lengthy event.  Prepping for an Ironman triathlon doesn’t just demand more training per day; if you want to be in peak shape for that kind of event, you’ll need to start training earlier, too.

 

bicycle bike riding2. Plan Out Your Training Schedule

We’re going to assume you’re planning for a sprint triathlon (but if you’re aiming higher than that, we salute you!). Start 3 months in advance. Create a calendar and map out your daily workouts.

For the first 2 months your schedule should break up the training evenly. 3 of the days should be dedicated to swimming, and 3 days should be dedicated to run-bike combos. The final day should be an easy, low-intensity bike ride to keep you from burning out. This 7-day schedule should help you build up your endurance and focus equally on all the aspects of the triathlon.

For the final month…

 

3. Focus Your Training on The Weak Link

You should still be training 30 minutes a day, but now, focus on your weakest leg.

Train accordingly. If your weak spot is swimming, swim 4 days instead of 3. If you struggle with running, dedicate one day strictly to running. Do a little extra training where you are lacking.  You don’t need to add more minutes, just adjust the breakdown.

Then, a week in advance…

 

slippery when wet4. Practice Your Transitions

Practice your transitions! Without practice, you could have butter fingers on the day of the competition. You will be rushing, and it will actually take longer than normal to do simple things.

Like tying your shoes. “If you leave your bike shoes clipped in to your pedals, for example, you’re going to crash the first few times you try to mount and dismount.”

Another good idea is to check out the course in advance, if possible. Familiarize yourself with the transition areas and practice there so that you are prepared for the real deal.

 

triathlon5. Start Out Slow

On the day of the competition, you will want to conserve your energy.

Don’t burn yourself out on the first leg. Start out with less than maximum effort. And try to gauge how much energy you will need to save to stay strong till the end.

Then, once you’re half-way through “you can pick up the pace and finish strong.

This is called a negative-split effort.”

 

music for allAdd Your Two Cents

Have you trained for a sprint triathlon before?
What methods do you use?
What was especially helpful?  What doesn’t work?

Please, let us know in the comment section.

About the author

Lauren Griffith
Lauren Griffith studied Exercise Science at BYU and loves to swim! That's why she loves Underwater Audio. She is also a massage therapist, a newlywed, and a comedy sitcom addict.

» More blog posts by Lauren Griffith

Posted by Lauren Griffith

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comments

    Oct 24
    2013

    BELLA

    10 pull-ups. 25 seconds!

    What’s YOUR time? 🙂

    Reply
      Nov 24
      2013

      Myftach

      Your first triathlon is going to be tough. Their is no way to sugar coat it. Go into it with the goal of hinavg fun and finishing it. Focus on your strengths. Running. Run 4-5 times a week and mix 2-4 days of biking in there. Make sure you do some brick workouts (ie. bike and then run workout right afterwords). Mix in some swim training when you can, and make sure your comfortable in open water (lake, ponds, river). This is prob more important than actually being good at swimming. Also, practice your transitions (taking off wetsuit, getting on bike, putting on running shoes), you can save alot of time, just by being good in between the swim, bike, and run.The training program you mentioned is decent, but it depends on what the distance of the triathlon is. Sprint Distance, Olympic Distance, other? I would personally always take one day off a week. I also don\’t substitute strength workout for a cardio workout, because the cardio is much more important in triathlon. The min amount of time you should spend training each time on the bike is 1hr, run 30-45min, and swim 30min.Hope this helps.

      Reply
    Oct 24
    2013

    YANCY

    45 Seconds! 😀

    Reply
      Nov 24
      2013

      Maria

      It really depdnes on how much time you have and your commitment.My first triathlon was Oct. 7th 2008. A sprint.My first Ironman distance will be Nov. 7th 2009.I have a 45 hr a week job, a family and a small business.I do a lot of workouts at 4am. Usually a swim/run or swim/spin class workout 1hr each. Weekends are spent on long rides (3+hrs) or Long runs (2+hrs) before sunrise and finished before 10:45am.You can go from Sprint to Oly in 3 months and prep for a 1/2 iron after 2 or 3 Oly’s under your belt. Once the half is done, then you can probably train up within another 4-6 months to finish an iron distance comfortably. Choose your race well.

      Reply
    Oct 24
    2013

    XAVIER

    23 seconds! 😛

    Reply
    Oct 24
    2013

    MITCHELL

    38 seconds! It’s a new personal best!

    Reply
      Nov 24
      2013

      Umar

      Ouch!! This hits close to home. I read a recent study that noted that men that were deemed weekend warriors were more likely to have a cardiac event on the weekends while engaged in physical activity. I think you hit the key. Everything in moderation. Don’t go to event unprepared and hope to just use adrenalin to get you thru to the finishline. That is not a substitute for proper training which includes 20-30 minutes of training 3 times a week, proper rest, good nutrition, and relaxation tecniques (massage/stretching). Moderation!!

      Reply
    Jul 22
    2016

    J.

    4.5 mins! it’s not how fast that is important, It’s that one can finish.

    Reply

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